News

Dec. 20, 2018

It has already been the case that it is against the Law to drive unaccompanied on a learner permit.

On 22 December 2018 the new legislation takes effect. That means that a learner driver who should be accompanied, but is driving unaccompanied, is liable to have their vehicle impounded. This is in addition to the penalties points and fixed charge fine which apply prior to this change.

The changes being introduced also mean that where the unaccompanied learner driver is not the vehicle owner, the vehicle could be impounded and owner liable to a fine of up to €1,000.

Nov. 30, 2018

In early 2019 new Regulations will allow drivers from outside of Ireland who hold a current valid car licence but come from a country that does not have a licence exchange agreement with Ireland to apply for a learner permit and complete a reduced EDT programme and apply for an Irish licence on completion of the mandatory Reduced EDT programme and successful passing of the Irish practical driving test.

The Reduced EDT programme is a mandatory driver training programme for drivers from outside of Ireland who currently hold a valid full car licence but come from a country who does not have a licence exchange agreement with Ireland.

Drivers having established their eligibility through the NDLS and who have received a learner permit will be required to complete the Reduced EDT Programme sessions 1, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10 before sitting the practical Driving Test.

Drivers who are eligible for the Reduced EDT programme will not be required to wait six months before taking the practical Irish Driving Test.

Sep. 16, 2016

The Road Safety Authority (RSA) has announced that from Monday 10 October, questions on drinking and driving will be added to the Driver Theory Test for the Motorcycle, Car and Works Vehicles Driver Theory Test. This is in direct response to a report issued by the RSA earlier this year which showed that drink-driving is still a significant road safety issue, particularly among some young people.

The main Driver Theory Test Question Bank will have 17 new questions on alcohol and driving. Two of these questions will be presented in each of the changed tests from 10 October 2016.

 

See the list of additional questions below:

 

  1. According to the pre-crash Report which gender was more likely to drink and drive and be involved in a fatal collision?

Answer: Males

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that more male than female drivers drink and drive and are involved in a fatal collision in Ireland. This means you need to be careful who you accept a lift from - can you be certain that your friend has not been drinking before they met up with you? Be sensible and say no to a lift if you suspect your friend has been drinking and plans to drive. If in doubt, make other arrangements for getting home.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report what type of vehicle were the majority of people driving when they had consumed alcohol and caused a fatal collision?

Answer: Private car

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that more private car drivers take alcohol than drivers of any other type of vehicle before being involved in a crash. This means that if you arrange a lift home in a car, after socialising where drink was available, you are more likely to have a driver who has taken alcohol. That means you cannot take your safety for granted. Do what you can to protect yourself and other friends - including the driver.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report what type of fatal collision was a person more likely to be involved in when drink driving?

Answer: Single-vehicle collision

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that the most common type of crash where alcohol is a factor is a single vehicle collision.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report which days of the week were people more likely to drink and drive and cause a fatal collision?

Answer: Saturday and Sunday

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that more alcohol related collisions occur on Saturday and Sunday compared to other days of the week.

  1. According to pre-crash Report how did the use of alcohol affect a person's decision to use a seatbelt?

Answer: Drivers and passengers were less likely to wear a seatbelt.

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that fewer drivers and passengers wore a seatbelt, in a car, after being drinking compared to drivers and passengers who had not been drinking. The evidence is that alcohol affects your judgment. This, combined with the fact that a driver is more likely to be distracted in this state, means a dangerous situation can develop quickly.

  1. What is the minimum blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level at which a learner or a novice driver is committing an offence?

Answer: 20mg

Rationale: The law sets different drink driving limits according to various categories of driver, with Blood Alcohol Concentration levels ranging from 20mg to 80mg. Learner or novice drivers are subject to the lowest drink driving limit.

  1. What is the maximum disqualification period imposed in court where the learner driver has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level in excess of 80 mg?

Answer: Six years

Rationale: When a learner driver is tested and has a Blood Alcohol Concentration level of over 80mg they face a driving ban of up to six years. So, think about that for a moment. How much do you depend on your car? Do you drive to work? Do family members depend on you for lifts? This can be all affected by you having a drink and then getting behind the wheel of a car.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report which age group had the highest number of drivers causing fatal collisions where alcohol was a factor?

Answer: 16-24years

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that drivers aged 16-24 years were more likely to drink and drive and cause a fatal collision. However, drinking and driving at any age is dangerous.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report how many people were killed by a driver who had consumed alcohol?

Answer: More than 251

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that between 2008 and 2012, at least 286 people were killed on our roads as a result of a driver who had consumed alcohol. Sadly, drivers still drink and drive. You can decide yourself or, better still, with your friends to never drink and drive. You can also decide to be careful about not distracting the driver while they are driving. It sounds simple - everyone should be able to do it. Discuss the issue and the consequences of drink driving when you are not out drinking. You owe it to yourselves, your friends and your families.

  1. A driver is automatically disqualified from driving for how long if, on a first offence, they refused to provide a member of An Garda Síochána with a sample of blood, urine or breath?

Answer: 4 years

Rationale: Drivers who refuse to provide a Garda with a breath, blood or urine sample can, for a first offence, be disqualified from driving for four years. But you don't need to be afraid of providing a sample if you have not been drinking. Please take time to consider the effect on your life and on your friends and family if you are banned from driving for any length of time.

  1. Which of the following is a possible consequence for a learner driver if they drive after drinking as little as just one unit of alcohol?

Answer: A three month disqualification from driving

Rationale: Even if you are within the legal limit for drinking, your driving will be affected. The safest approach is to never drink and drive. In some cases, one drink may push a learner driver over the reduced Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) level and lead to a three month disqualification from driving.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report out of 867 fatal collisions how many had alcohol as a contributory factor?

Answer: 251-350

Rationale: Drink driving is a killer behaviour. 330 collisions involved a driver, cyclist, motorcyclist or pedestrian who had consumed alcohol. The pre-crash Report found that the most common collision type - where alcohol is a factor - is a single vehicle collision.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report what age group had the highest number of passenger deaths in collisions where alcohol was a factor?

Answer: 17-24 years

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that passengers in the 17-24 age group are at the highest risk for being killed in a collision involving alcohol. All drinking and driving is dangerous but this age group is most likely to be at risk.
Be sensible and say no to a lift if you suspect your friend has been drinking and plans to drive. If in doubt, make other arrangements for getting home.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report how many passengers were killed in a collision where alcohol was a known factor?

Answer: 71 - 90

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that 83 passengers were killed in an alcohol related collision where a driver or motorcyclist had been drinking between 2008 and 2012. In addition, passengers who have been drinking may contribute to crashes, sometimes distracting the driver. Safe and socially responsible road use goes beyond the drivers themselves. If you want to stay safe, you must take responsibility for your own actions, especially as to how they might affect drivers and other road users.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report what percentage of the 169 drivers killed in an alcohol related collision had consumed alcohol?

Answer: 92%

Rationale: The figures speak for themselves: The pre-crash Report found that 9 out of 10 drivers who were killed in alcohol related collisions had consumed alcohol prior to the fatal collision. Drivers are affected by drinking even small amounts of alcohol. Alcohol affects your judgement, vision, co-ordination and reaction time, which in turn lead to serious driving errors.

  1. According to the pre-crash Report how many pedestrians were killed where alcohol consumption by the pedestrian was a factor?

Answer: 41 – 90

Rationale: Alcohol affects everybody who takes it. The pre-crash Report found that 81 pedestrians killed during 2008-2012 had consumed alcohol. This shows us that no matter what kind of road user you are, you need to take care and avoid using the roads when you have been drinking.

  1. According to the pre-crash report in how many fatal collisions was alcohol a contributory factor?

Answer: 4 out of 10

Rationale: The pre-crash Report found that the number of fatal collisions where alcohol was a factor was about four out of every 10. Drink driving is a killer behaviour. Drivers take the risk despite the high death rates. The RSA believes that some drivers are not considering the consequences. Otherwise, they would never ever drink and drive. Alcohol affects your judgment. Even one drink, where you may still be below the legal limit, will alter your behaviour. There is no safe limit.



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co. Carlow: Aghade, Ardattin, Bagenalstown, Ballon, Ballinkillin, Ballymurphy, Borris, Carlow Town, Clonegal, Clonmore, Fenagh, Garryhill, Glynn, Graiguecullen, Grange, Hacketstown, Kildavin, Killeshin, Leighlinbridge, Magney, Myshall, Newtown, Nurney, Old Leighlin, Palatine, Pollerton, Rathoe, Rathvilly, St. Mullins, Tinryland, Tullow

co. Kilkenny: Aughamucky, Ballycallan, Ballyfoyle, Ballyhale, Ballyragget, Bennettsbridge, Callan, Carrigeen, Castlecomer, Castlewarren Clara, Clogh, Conahy, Cuffesgrange, Dunmore, Dunnamaggin, Ferrybank, Fiddown, Freshford, Galmoy, Glenmore, Goresbridge, Gowran, Graiguenamanagh, Hugginstown, Inistioge, Jenkinstown, Johnstown, Johnswell, Kells, Kilkenny, Killamery, Killinaspick, Kilmacow, Kilmanagh, Kilmoganny, Knocktopher, Lisdowney, Moneenroe, Mooncoin, Mulinbeg, Mullinavat, Owning, Paulstown, Piltown, Riverquarter, Rosbercon, Slieverue, Stoneyford, Templeorum, The Rower, Thomastown, Tullahought, Tullaroan, Tullogher, Urlingford, Windgap

co. Laoise: Abbeyleix, Aghaboe, Arless, Ballacolla, Ballaghmore, Ballickmoyler, Ballinakill, Ballybrittas, Ballybrophy, Ballyfin, Ballyhide, Ballylynan, Ballylinan, Ballyroan, Barrowhouse, Borris-in-Ossory, Castletown, Clonaghadoo, Clonaslee, Clough, Crettyard, Cullohill, Donaghmore, Durrow, Emo, Errill, Jamestown, Killeen, Kilbricken, Killenard, Killeshin, Magney, Mountmellick, Mountrath, New Inn, Newtown, Port Laoise, Portarlington, Raheen, Rathdowney, Rosenallis, Shanahoe, Spink, Stradbally, The Swan, Timahoe, Vicarstown